Excursion to Montreal, September 25

September 25 All day

Your AFLCR is going to Montreal! On Sunday, September 25, 2022, we are offering a guided trip to the Old City of Montreal. It’s open to twelve people, members and nonmembers alike

If you’re interested in participating, please register right away. Registration is free. Anticipated costs, including parking, admission to sites, lunch, etc., where known, are indicated on the itinerary. We’ll provide additional details once you’ve registered. 

We have one driver but are looking for another—someone with a car that can accommodate 5 people. Could that be you? 

If you have questions, please contact Marjorie London at secretary@aflcr.org.

Click here to register!

Itinerary

7:00 am: Depart from Alliance Française, 43 King St., Burlington 

Enter Montreal over the Champlain Bridge. In June 2019, Montreal celebrated the opening of this 3.4-kilometer bridge, one of the largest and busiest in North America. Spanning the St. Lawrence River and its international shipping channel, it is a vital thoroughfare for both goods and people.

9:30 am: Mount Royal Chalet, 1196 Camillien-Houde Road

At the summit of Montreal’s namesake mountain, you will find the Mount Royal Chalet. With its iconic architecture, it’s part of the city’s heritage, and a perfect vantage point for viewing the city skyline. 

Montreal from Mount Royal
View from Mount Royal Chalet

Outside, the stone façade features large windows and elegant doors, while the adjoining Kondiaronk Belvedere lookout affords a breathtaking vista of downtown Montreal and the Monteregian Hills in the distance. Inside, large-scale paintings depict the history of Montreal by Canadian artists, including Marc-Aurèle Fortin, Paul-Émile Borduas, and Edwin H. Holgate. Exposed beams decorated with carved wooden squirrels, chandeliers, and a large fireplace complete the rustic scene.

Parking: $3 to $3.75 per hour.* Parking kiosks accept credit cards.

10:30 am: Depart for Old Montreal

Park at the Old Port of Montreal, 333 de la Commune West, Old Montreal. Parking costs $35 per car per day.

11:00 am: Musée Pointe-à-Callière, 350 Place Royale

The Pointe-à-Callière Museum of archaeology and history was founded in 1992 as part of Montreal’s 350th birthday celebrations. The museum exhibits artifacts from the region’s First Nations that illustrate how the cultures coexisted and interacted. Other displays show how the French and British influenced the history of this territory over the years. In 1924 Pointe-à-Callière was designated a Montreal’s Birthplace National Historic Site. Admission: Adult (31 to 64) $25, senior (65+) $24 (valid ID required)

1:00 pm: Vieux-Port Steakhouse, 39 Saint Paul Street East

We’ll stop here for lunch. According to its website, “The quality of our meat has made us famous while our welcoming service, attentive staff, and classic décor made us a must in Montreal. Located directly on St. Paul Street in a superb century-old building, Vieux-Port Steakhouse will charm you with its authentic stone walls, hardwood floors, and cozy fireplaces.”

Montreal Notre Dame basilica
Notre Dame Basilica

2:30 pm: Notre-Dame Basilica, 110 Notre-Dame Street West

Notre-Dame, according to its website, “stands as a majestic testament to the importance of religion and art throughout the city’s history. It is a masterpiece of Gothic Revival architecture. The basilica’s interior is a sight to behold, with its blue colours, shimmering gold-leaf ornamentation, intricate woodwork, religious paintings and colourful stained-glass windows depicting over 350 years. Featuring a 7,000-pipe Casavant organ, its remarkable acoustics are only matched by the beauty of the surroundings.

“To learn more about the Basilica, take part in self-guided tours, where you will be invited to explore 24 points of interest, each highlighting works of art, architectural elements and much more.”

Montreal Hotel de Ville
Hôtel de Ville

Admission: Adult or senior $14.00 + $1.00 service fee; group (10+) $12.00 + $1.00 service fee*

4:00 pm: Hôtel de Ville (City Hall), 275 Notre-Dame Street East

In 1967, from the balcony of the Montreal City Hall, French president Charles de Gaulle spoke the powerful phrase “Vive le Québec libre” to the people of Quebec. Translated as “Long Live Free Quebec,” it was considered an endorsement of Quebec sovereignty. Partially due to the Canadian government’s outrage at this statement, De Gaulle had to cut his visit short.

5:00 – 7:00 pm: Free time for shopping and dinner 

Farewell to Montreal, return to Burlington via Pont Jacques Cartier

We hope you had a wonderful day!

Nous espérons que vous avez passé une merveilleuse journée!

*Costs are in Canadian dollars

Photos @Wikimedia Commons